Map, Compass & GPS

Map, Compass & GPS
Wild flowers along Fall Creek on the way to the Green Lakes - Oregon

Sunday, September 2, 2018

Snakes


 The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is reminding the public to be rattlesnake safe. All of California is snake country. Much like bats, rattlesnakes are often misunderstood. They play an important role in the ecosystem by keeping rodent populations under control.

California has six venomous snakes, all of which are various species of rattlesnake. They are heavy-bodied, blunt-tailed with triangular-shaped heads. A rattle may not always be present, as they are often lost through breakage and not developed on the young. Additional species information can be found here.


Rattlesnakes are generally not aggressive and usually strike when threatened or provoked. Given room, they will retreat and want to be left alone. They are not confined to rural areas and have been found in urban environments, lakeside parks and golf courses.
The best protection against unwelcome rattlesnakes in the yard is to have a “rattlesnake-proof” fence. The fence should either be solid or with mesh no larger than one-quarter inch. It should be at least 3 feet high with the bottom buried a few inches in the ground.
Keep the fence clear of vegetation and debris. Encourage and protect kingsnakes, which prey on rattlesnakes, and other natural competitors like gopher snakes and racers.

On rare occasions, rattlesnakes can cause serious injury to humans. Most bites occur between the months of April and October when humans are most active outdoors. The California Poison Control Center notes that rattlesnakes account for more than 800 bites each year in the U.S. with one to two deaths. 
CDFW recommends the following outdoor safety precautions:
  • Wear hiking boots and loose-fitting long pants.
  • Never go barefoot or wear sandals when walking through wild areas.
  • When hiking, stick to well-used trails.
  • Avoid tall grass, weeds and heavy underbrush where snakes may hide during the day.
  • Do not step or put your hands where you cannot see, and avoid wandering around in the dark.
  • Step ON logs and rocks, never over them, and be especially careful when climbing rocks or gathering firewood.
  • Remember, rattlesnakes can swim so never grab “sticks” or “branches” while swimming in lakes and rivers.
  • Teach children to respect snakes and to leave them alone.

What to do in the event of a snake bite:
  • Stay calm and wash the bite area gently with soap and water.
  • Remove watches, rings, etc, which may constrict swelling.
  • Immobilize the affected area and go to the nearest medical facility.
What you should NOT do after a rattlesnake bite:

  • DON’T apply a tourniquet.
  • DON’T pack the bite area in ice.
  • DON’T cut the wound with a knife or razor.
  • DON’T use your mouth to suck out the venom.
  • DON’T let the victim drink alcohol. 
A great article on snake bites was published in Outside Magazine.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Map Datum



For most hikers, the map datum selection isn't critical.  New and right out of the box, GPS receivers are set to Map Datum WGS84. And for most hikers that setting will be just fine. Out and back - no problem.


But if you are going to take coordinates taken from a map or from a friend, AND accuracy is important, ensure you use the right map datum.

Map Datum is defined as:
"A mathematical model of the Earth used by map makers.  Datum allows for the accurate transfer of geographic data from a spherical earth to a flat map.  In the United States, there are three common map datum’s found on topographic maps.  These are WGS 84, North American Datum 1927 (NAD27) and NAD83.  Select the datum that is used on the map. " 
 Not selecting the correct map datum could induce an error of over 100 meters/yards. I emphasize that hiking groups should all be on the “same page” regarding the set-up options of their GPS receivers. 

Map Datum information is found in the map key on most maps.  

While planning a journey or at the trail head, taking the time to adjust settings among hiking partners is critical.  Before departing, validating map datum and coordinate format should be a priority.

First, match the map’s datum.  A topographic map identifies datum in the map key.  Once the datum is identified ensure that all GPS receivers are set to match the correct datum.  See the illustration below.

For more information on GPS setup setting check out:

Improving GPS AccuracySetup Your GPS



      












Thursday, August 9, 2018

Foods Toxic to Dogs


My wife and I have been doing quite a bit of traveling this summer.  In late May we visited our friends in Virginia.  We had a very long day of flying and looked forward to a relaxing visit.  While we were recuperating, the family’s dog was in the guest room scrounging through one of our suite cases.  My wife went to the guest room, found the dog and importantly, found a bag of Dove Dark Chocolate that had been opened with all the contents gone.  Out host called the local Vet Emergency room and was told to get the dog to the Vet ASAP.

On their arrival, the Vet administered a shot that quickly caused the dog to throw-up.  
The following are foods that are poisonous to our pets.  The Humane Society has a complete listing.

Alcohol
Avocado
Chocolate, Coffee and Caffeine
Citrus
Coconut and Coconut Oil
Grapes and Raisins
Macadamia Nuts
Milk and Dairy
Nuts
Onions, Garlic, Chives
Raw/Undercooked Meat, Eggs and Bones
Salt and Salty Snack Foods
Xylitol
Yeast Dough


If you believe that your pet has ingested toxic foods contact the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435. 

Check the label information on the food product.  The Dove Chocolate packaging had a phone number on the back for emergency support.  I called that number and received excellent help.







Thursday, April 5, 2018

How to Store Your Camping Gear

The following post is by Guest Contributor Lee

You will need to store your camping gear between outdoor activities. However, don't just throw all your items into a closet. Instead, follow these camping gear tips to ensure you are ready for your next adventure.

Put Your Items in a Secluded Place

Unless you go for an adventure every week, you probably want your camping gear to stay in a safe and secluded space. Space needed will depend on how much equipment you need to store, but some of the places where you can store your camping gear include the garage, an unused closet, or the attic. Consider finding a self-storage unit if you don't have enough space in your house to keep your camping gear.

Keep Your Camping Gear in a Sealed Container

Don't just go with the cheapest option when you are looking for camping storage containers. Instead, look for containers or shelves that meet your needs and are durable. You could store outdoor gear on heavy duty wall shelves or in portable lockers that can serve as a bench while camping. Make sure to get tightly sealed containers if you live in an area with high humidity. Moreover, tie-down loops and reinforced handles can help secure the storage locker in your vehicle.

Label Every Package

Once you have sorted out the gear, place them in labeled containers. It can be advantageous to use clear packages as they let you see what is inside. However, labeling makes it easier to find an item. You can use a permanent marker to write on the bag or packaging container. Alternatively, you can apply self-sticking labels to each container or bag. Self-sticking tags can be an attractive option especially if you want to make changes later or if you are short-sighted.
Your labeling options can change a bit if you are using fabric containers such as canvas bags. You can use a sewing machine to personalize your gear. Alternatively, you can attach luggage tags to the handles. You can use duct tape to make personalized luggage tags. You can also write descriptions on slips of paper and attach them to your bags or containers using a laminator. You can use whatever is at your disposal to be as creative as possible.

Keep the Odor at Bay

Nothing is more irritating than pulling out your camping gear before an adventure and discovering that it smells awful. Your camping gear can be ruined by dirt, mildew, and/or bad odor. It is necessary to clean your camping gear thoroughly before your next trip. Clean and dry your camping gear, especially your bedding and tent before even storing it to avoid a disgusting smell. You can also pack a dryer sheet along with your camping gear to help with the smell.

Compartmentalize Smaller Items

To help keep track of everything, it would be good to put small, related items together. You can keep cooking gadgets and utensils in something like a toolbox. You can browse the internet to find boxes of different sizes and shapes to ensure you find the container that fits whatever you want to store. Plastic bags are an inexpensive and convenient option for storing as well. You can even recycle items such as comforter bags and coffee cans to reduce the costs. You will be able to find what works best for you.


Hopefully these tips can help you figure out how best to store your camping gear between trips this summer. You’re going to want to be able to find everything each time you go, and maybe incorporating a few of these can help you. 

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Wilderness Guide

The National Outdoor Leadership School's "Wilderness Guide" is a wonderful book to add to your backcountry library.

"The classic backpackers handbook - revised and updated with information anon new equipment and techniques-providing expert guidelines for backpackers, hikers, campers- anyone who loves the outdoors."

Author Mark Harvey is a NOLS instructor and  freelance writer.

This book is an excellent first step in the planning process for backcountry  travel.

Available at Amazon.


Friday, March 30, 2018

Magnetic Declination

Declination: A Noun. The horizontal angle between the true geographic North Pole and the magnetic North Pole, as figured from a specific point on the Earth.”

 Declination is a term that causes “brain cramps” for many of my students in my map and compass classes. When I mention Magnetic Declination eyes roll.

The web site www.magnetic-declination.com has an excellent discussion of what declination is and what causes it:

“Magnetic declination varies both from place to place, and with the passage of time. As a traveler cruises the east coast of the United States, for example, the declination varies from 20 degrees west (in Maine) to zero (in Florida), to 10 degrees east (in Texas), ......the magnetic declination in a given area will change slowly over time, possibly as much as 2-25 degrees every hundred years or so.......... Complex fluid motion in the outer core of the Earth (the molten metallic region that lies from 2800 to 5000 km below the Earth's surface) causes the magnetic field to change slowly with time."

Land navigation is based on the relationship to the North Pole; also known as “true north.  The measure of degrees of direction in relation to true north is called “degrees true.”  Maps are laid out in degrees true.  Land features (buttes, mountains, streams) on a topographic map are in reference to degrees true.  By that I mean the bearing from one mountain peak to another will be referenced in degrees true.  The map below illustrates that point. 








Magnetic compasses do not point to true north (the North Pole); the magnetic needle points to an area that could be considered the magnetic North Pole. 
As illustrated below, declination data can be found in the diagram at the bottom of a USGS topographic map, (on some commercially produced maps it can be hard to find.) 

Because declination changes over time, I recommend that map declination information be verified at www.magnetic-declination.com.   This is essential in the Pacific Northwest where maps are notoriously out of date in terms of road,  and city data.
So, how do we make this simple?  How do we convert magnetic to degrees true?
I could do the math.  In Oregon, where I live, the magnetic declination is 15.6° East declination.

My recommendation: have the compass do the work so that there is no confusion with the math.

To do this, I need to choose a compass that can be adjusted for declination.  Some examples are the Silva Ranger or the Suunto M3.

With one of these compasses, the compass dial or housing is adjusted and rotated manually.  Both the Suunto and Silva Ranger come with a small, flat adjusting tool.  Consult with owner’s manual that came with the compass.

If declination is Easterly (Western U.S.) I will rotate the dial causing the baseplate’s orienting arrow to move in a clockwise direction.

   If declination is Westerly (Eastern U.S.) I will rotate the dial causing the baseplate’s orienting arrow to move in a counter-clockwise direction.

Now, adjust the dial and align the red magnetic needle on top of the orienting arrow (the red arrow engraved on the baseplate) the compass will provide directions in degrees true.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Managing Your GPS Waypoints




Outdoor Quest //Blake Miller image

 Lots of things can happen to a GPS Waypoint or data file.  You can put data in. You can take data out.  You can lose it (the GPS breaks or the wrong button entry is selected.)  But be careful, far worse, too much data can make your navigation difficult.

 In my land navigation class I stress keeping your navigation simple.  Frequent and simple Waypoint management is essential to GPS use.  When it’s time to return to the truck, it should be obvious what GPS Waypoint to select. 

 Dump the junk before the start of a trip.  As you leave the trail head your GPS should have only necessary data saved on your GPS.  That Waypoint for the fishing hole is important but needs to be saved elsewhere.

 Start by deleting Waypoints that really are not needed.  Free those data bites to the atmosphere.

 To save your “got to have, must save Waypoints:” 

             1.            Use Garmin’s “Trip and Waypoint Manager.”  It probably came with your GPS.  It can also be purchased from Garmin for about $30.00; www.garmin.com.  Down load those Waypoints to your PC.

 2.            If you don’t have the Garmin program, consider “Easy GPS.”  It is free and available at www.easygps.com.

            3.            Log the important data in a notebook.

 Electronic storage allows you to save Waypoints and track data (that bread crumb trail on your map screen.)  Further, you can upload old Waypoints another day for a trip to that special fishing spot.  This data can also be down loaded into your friends GPS too.  It can also be uploaded to your new GPS in the future.

 Remember though; when you receive or transfer GPS Waypoint data always verify that you have the compatible map datum and coordinate system set on your receiver.

 Finally, give important Waypoints a name.  It’s easier to remember a GPS Waypoint named “CAMP” instead of 21 (or was it 25.)